Category Archives: Privacy

Victory! Supreme Court Says Fourth Amendment Applies to Cell Phone Tracking

The Supreme Court handed down a landmark opinion today in Carpenter v. United States, ruling 5-4 that the Fourth Amendment protects cell phone location information. In an opinion by Chief Justice Roberts, the Court recognized that location information, collected by cell providers like Sprint, AT&T, and Verizon, creates a “detailed chronicle of a person’s physical… Read More »

Illinois Declines to Adopt Proposed Arbitrary Drone Surveillance of Protests

Observers often forget that surveillance offends not only privacy, but also the right to dissent. A recently defeated Illinois bill illustrates how First and Fourth Amendment rights intersect, by proposing to undermine the right to dissent not obliquely, but rather directly. That’s why EFF joined the successful fight to defeat this spying proposal. The proposal, promoted… Read More »

Journalists and Digital Security: Some Thoughts on the NYT Leak Case

The leak investigation involving a Senate staffer and a New York Times reporter raises significant issues about journalists, digital security, and the ability of journalists to protect confidential sources. The New York Times recently revealed that the FBI had been investigating a former aide to the Senate Intelligence Committee, James Wolfe, for possibly leaking classified… Read More »

Victory for Privacy: Supreme Court Says Cell Phone Location Records Protected Under Fourth Amendment

In a landmark ruling, the U.S. Supreme Court held that the Fourth Amendment protects location records generated by mobile phones. The government in Carpenter v. United States had obtained more than 6 months of location records without a warrant. EPIC filed a “friend-of-the-court” brief in Carpenter, signed by thirty-six technical experts and legal scholars, urging… Read More »

Victory: California Overhauls Police Database Oversight Procedures in Wake of EFF Investigations

New Data Shows Law Enforcement Abused Network 143 Times in 2017 San Francisco – Responding to years of investigations and pressure from the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), the California Attorney General’s Office has overhauled and improved its oversight of law enforcement access to a computer network containing the sensitive personal data of millions of state… Read More »

The California Attorney General’s Office Says It’s Finally Taking Database Abuse Seriously—But Time Will Tell

In 2017, 22 law enforcement employees across California lost or left their jobs after abusing the computer network that grants police access to criminal histories and drivers’ records, according to new data compiled by the California Attorney General’s office. The records obtained by EFF show a total of 143 violations of database rules—the equivalent of… Read More »